Montepulciano Wine Information

Montepulciano growing area's in Spain  This black-skinned grape variety that is widely grown in central and southern Italy. Montepulciano is rarely grown in northern Italy because the grape has a tendency to ripen late, making them susceptible to frosts in cooler Northern regions, and can be excessively “green” if harvested too early. Noted for its soft flavors, strong color and gentle tannins.

Montepulciano is a permitted grape variety in around 50 DOC and DOCG regions throughout Italy, and may be blended with other varieties. It's most common blending partner is Sangiovese, and these 2 varieties are thought to be genetically linked.

Small amounts of Montepulciano are grown in the United states, Australia and New Zealand. Some wines produced in these countries are showing real promise, but are still regarded as being in the experimental stage.

Montepulciano Wine Regions

Montepulciano is Italy's second most widely dispersed grape variety, behind Sangiovese. Montepulciano is a recommended planting in 20 of Italy's 95 provinces, and is a permitted or required grape variety in many DOCs and DOCG's including:

Alezio DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Negroamaro, Sangiovese and Malvasia.

Biferno DOC – (Molise) Must be 60–70% of the wine. Can be blended with Trebbiano Toscano (in rosé and red wines) and Aglianico.

Brindisi DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Negroamaro, Sangiovese and Malvasia.

Cacc'e mmitte di Lucera DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Sumarello, Sangiovese, Malvasia, Trebbiano and Bombino Bianco.

Castel Del Monte DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Uva di Troia, Sangiovese, Aglianico and Pinot noir.

Castelli Romani DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Cesanese, Merlot, Sangiovese and Nero Buono.

Cerveteri DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Sangiovese, Cesanese, Canaiolo Nero, Carignan and Barbera.

Cesanese di Olevano Romano DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Cesanese, Sangiovese, Barbera, Trebbiano and Bambino Bianco.

Colli Amerini DOC – (Umbria) can be blended with Sangiovese, Ciliegiolo, Canaiolo, Merlot and Barbera.

Colli Etruschi Viterbesi DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Sangiovese.

Colli Maceratesi DOC – (Marche) can be blended with Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Ciliegiolo, Lacrima, Merlot and Vernaccia Nera.

Colli Martani DOC – (Umbria) can be blended with Sangiovese, Canaiolo, Ciliegiolo, Barbera, Merlot, Trebbiano, Grechetto, Malvasia, Garganega and Verdicchio.

Colli Perugini DOC – (Umbria) can be blended with Sangiovese, Ciligiolo, Barbera and Merlot.

Colli Pesaresi DOC – (Marche) can be blended with Sangiovese and Ciligiolo.

Colli di Rimini DOC – (Emilia-Romagna) can be blended with Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Barbera, Terrano and Ancellotta.

Collo della Romagna Centrale DOC – (Emilia-Romagna) can be blended with Cabernet Sauvignon, Sangiovese, Barbera and Merlot.

Colli della Sabina DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Sangiovese.

Controguerra DOC – (Abruzzi) At least 60% of the blend. Can be blended with Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc.

Copertino DOC – (Abruzzi) can be blended with Negroamaro, Malvasia and Sangiovese.

Cori DOC – (Latium) can be blended with Nero Buono and Bonvino Nero.

Esino DOC – (Marche) Along with Sangiovese must be at least 60% of the blend with local varieties filling out the rest.

Gioia del Colle DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Primitivo, Sangiovese, Negroamara and Malvasia.

Lacrima di Morro d'Alba DOC – (Marche) can be blended with Lacrima and Verdicchio.

Leverano DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Negroamaro, Malvasia and Sangiovese.

Lizzano DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Negroamaro, Sangiovese, Bombino Nero, Pinot noir and Malvasia.

Montepulciano d'Abruzzo DOC – (Abruzzi) at 85% of the wine. Can be blended with Sangiovese.

Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Colline Teramane DOCG – (Abruzzi) at least 85% of the wine. Can be blended with Sangiovese.

Nardo DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Negro Amaro and Malvasia.

Offida DOC – (Marche) at least 50% of the wine. Can be blended with Cabernet Sauvignon.

Orta Nova DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Uva di Troia, Lambrusco Maestri and Trebbiano.

Parrina DOC – (Tuscany) can be blended with Sangiovese, Canaiolo and Colorino.

Pentro di Isernia DOC – (Molise) at least 45–55% of the wine with Sangiovese making up the other component.

Rosso Barletta DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Uva di Troia, Sangiovese and Malbec.

Rosso Canosa DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Uva di Troia and Sangiovese.

Rosso di Cerignola DOC – (Apulia) can be blended with Uva di Troia, Negroamaro, Sangiovese, Barbera, Malbec and Trebbiano.

Rosso Conero DOC – (Marche) at least 85–100% of the wine with Sangiovese making up the other component.

Rosso Orvietano DOC – (Umbria) can be blended with Aleatico, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Canaiolo, Ciliegiolo, Merlot, Pinot noir, Sangiovese, Barbera, Cesanese, Colorino and Dolcetto. Can be a varietal with 85% of the blend but that is rarely seen.

Rosso Piceno DOC – (Marche) can be blended with Sangiovese, Trebbiano and Passerino.

San Severo DOC – (Apulia) at least 70–100% of the blend with Sangiovese making up the other component.

Tarquinia DOC – (Latium) either/or with Sangiovese to make up a minimum 60% of the wine. Can be blended with Cesanese.

Torgiano DOC – (Umbria) can be blended with Sangiovese, Canaiolo, Trebbiano and Ciliegiolo.

Torgiano Rosso Riserva DOCG – (Umbria) can ble blend with Sangiovese, Canaiolo, Trebbiano and Ciliegiolo.

Velletri DOC – (Lazio) can be blended with Sangiovese, Cesanese, Bombino Nero, Merlot and Ciliegiolo.

Vernaccia di Serrapetrona DOCG – (Marche) can be blend with Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, Sangiovese and Ciligiolo.

Montepulciano Wine Tasting Notes

Wines produced using this variety are typically full bodied with deep colour, spicy and plummy flavours and high levels of tannin. They usually improve with some bottle ageing. Montepulciano pairs well with hearty Italian cuisine or with sharp cheeses.